How To Stick Weld Vertical

How To Stick Weld Vertical?

Vertical welding is the process of welding two pieces together at a vertical angle. The relationship is welded at a vertical angle of 45 or less.

Suppose you’re going to weld a framework for a structure or anything else. In that case, this is usually the position where you’ll be welding.

Horizontal and flat stick welding is far easier than vertical stick welding. Gravity aids us here. The molten puddle will tend to seek the lowest point, which is the centre of the electrode.

Downhand welding is where you’re welding from the top down. It’s just the opposite of overhead welding. It is usually used when joining two pieces at right angles. The most common example is when you’re welding a piece of plate to a pipe.

The welder holds the electrode and torch in his hands and points them down at work while moving around the circumference of the pipe.

The Setting Of Stick Welder For Vertical Welding

When welding vertical up, the welder is set at a higher amperage than when welding flat. The electrons have a harder time travelling through the weld pool when gravity works against them. A higher amperage will help to overcome this and produce a good weld.

The welder also uses a smaller electrode diameter when welding vertical up. It will help produce a more focused arc that can penetrate the weld pool more easily.

Finally, it is important to use a slightly slower travel speed when welding vertical up. That will help prevent the weld from becoming too hot and causing warping or other damage to the metal.

Stick Welding Techniques For Vertical Welding

Welding Upward:

Hold the rod at 90 degrees to the plate and push it along

the joint. You can use your other hand to help stabilize

the rod as you weld.

Welding Downward:

Tilt the torch forward so the flame points down

at a slight angle. That will help you direct the heat into

the seam. As you weld, hold the rod at a 90-degree angle to

the plate and push it along the joint.

Weave Welding Vertical With Stick Welding:

Weave welding is a type of welding where you move the torch

back and forth across the joint. This technique can be used

for both vertically up and downward welding. Hold

the rod at a 90-degree angle to the plate to weld upward and push it along

the joint while moving the torch back and forth. To weld

downward, tilt the torch forward, so the flame is pointing

down at a slight angle and weave the torch across the seam.

Types Of Joints With Stick Welding Vertical

Three types of joints can be used when stick welding vertical: Tee, Lap, and Butt.

-Vertical Tee Joint-

It is the most common type of joint used when stick welding vertical. It is also the strongest of the three types of joints. The tee joint is created by intersecting two pieces of metal at a 90-degree angle. To weld a tee joint vertically, you must start at the bottom and work your way up:

  • Guide the welding rod in a weaving triangle pattern for optimum penetration and fusion. See illustration A for an example. However, if you pause briefly after every few triangles, you’ll get better penetration and fusion.

If you notice that the weld rod filler material becomes heated but do not want to break the arc, pull the rod from the weld crater but do not extinguish the flame. The key to this approach’s success is that it allows for solidifying without dripping down and liquefication without creating a puddle. Then, return the welding rod to the weld crater so you may maintain the size of your weld as desired.

-Vertical Lap Joint-

A lap joint is created when two pieces of metal overlap each other. To stick weld a vertical lap joint, you must start at the top and work your way down.

When welding a lap joint, it is important to use the weaving technique described above to get good penetration and fusion. In addition, be sure to maintain a small gap between the two pieces of metal you are welding. This gap will allow for proper penetration and fusion.

-Vertical Butt Joint-

This type of joint welds two pieces of metal that are flush with each other. To weld, a vertical butt joint, start by placing the electrode so that it is perpendicular to the workpiece and at the bottom of the joint. Next, strike an arc and move the electrode up the joint until you reach the top. Finally, welding downward using a back-and-forth motion until the entire joint is filled. This type of joint is the weakest of the three and should only be used when welding very thin metals.

Tips for vertical stick welding

-When stick welding vertical, use a slightly slower travel speed to prevent the weld from becoming too hot.

-To weld upward, hold the rod at a 90-degree angle to the plate and push it along the joint. You can use your other hand to help stabilize the rod as you weld.

-To weld downward, tilt the torch forward so that the flame points down at a slight angle. It will help you direct the heat into the seam. As you weld, hold the rod at a 90-degree angle to the plate and push it along the joint.

-Weave welding is a type of welding where you move the torch back and forth across the joint. This technique can be used for both vertically up and downward welding.

Polarity While Stick Welding Vertical

When stick welding vertical, you will want to use reverse polarity. That means that the electrode will be connected to the negative terminal of the welder, and the workpiece will be connected to the positive terminal. Reverse polarity will provide more penetration when stick welding vertical.

If you use a DC stick welder, you can use either DC reverse polarity (DCRP) or AC polarity. DCRP will provide more penetration, while AC polarity will provide less penetration but fewer fumes and spatter. You must use AC polarity if you use an AC stick welder.

Conclusion

Stick welding is a versatile welding process that is used for a variety of applications. When stick welding vertical, it is important to use the proper technique to get good penetration and fusion. In addition, be sure to use the correct electrode and polarity for your particular application.

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