How To Read Welding Symbols

How To Read Welding Symbols?

Welding symbols are used to provide information about welding operations on drawings. They can be placed on either the drawing or a separate welding symbol chart.

Instructions

The following instructions will show you how to interpret common welding symbols:

The basic weld symbol consists of a few different parts:

– The reference line is a single or double line that serves as the base for all the other elements in the symbol. This line is usually drawn perpendicular to the edge of the drawing.

– The arrow points to the side of the joint that will be welded first.

– The root symbol indicates the type of WeldWeld being used (e.g., butt, fillet, etc.).

– The dimensions show the size, angle, and other important details about the WeldWeld.

Common welding symbols and their meanings:

– Butt weld: A butt weld is a type of WeldWeld that joins two pieces of metal together at their edges. The most common symbol for a butt weld is a simple line with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

– Fillet Weld: A fillet weld is a type of WeldWeld that joins two pieces of metal together at an angle. The most common symbol for a fillet weld is a curved line with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

– Lap joint: A lap joint is a type of WeldWeld that joins two pieces of metal together by overlapping them. The most common symbol for a lap joint is two parallel lines with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

– Spot weld: A spot weld is a type of WeldWeld that joins two pieces of metal together by welding them at small dots or points. The most common symbol for a spot weld is a circle with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

– T-joint: A T-joint is a type of WeldWeld that joins two pieces of metal together in the shape of a T. The most common symbol for a T-joint is a single line with two arrows pointing to the sides that will be welded first.

– Edge weld: An edge weld is a type of WeldWeld that joins two pieces of metal along their edges. The most common symbol for an edge weld is a single line with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

– Square butt joint: A square butt joint is a type of Butt weld that joins two pieces of metal together at right angles. The most common symbol for a square butt joint is a single line with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

– Round butt joint: A round butt joint is a type of Butt weld that joins two pieces of metal together at an angle other than 90 degrees. The most common symbol for a round butt joint is a single line with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

– Bevel groove weld: A bevel groove weld is a type of WeldWeld that joins two pieces of metal together by welding them at an angle. The most common symbol for a bevel groove weld is a single line with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

– Flush groove weld: A flush groove weld is a type of WeldWeld that joins two pieces of metal together by welding them flush (at the same level). The most common symbol for a flush groove weld is a single line with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

– J-groove weld: A J-groove weld is a type of WeldWeld that joins two pieces of metal together in the shape of a J. The most common symbol for a J-groove weld is a single line with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

– U-groove weld: A U-groove weld is a type of WeldWeld that joins two pieces of metal together in the shape of a U. The most common symbol for a U-groove weld is a single line with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

– V-groove weld: A V-groove weld is a type of WeldWeld that joins two pieces of metal together in the shape of a V. The most common symbol for a V-groove weld is a single line with an arrow pointing to the side that will be welded first.

Other Supplementary Symbols That Are Used Often In Welding Diagrams Include:

– Weld all around: The all-around wild symbol is a circle with an “X” inside. This symbol indicates that a welding symbol applies to all sides of the joint.

– Root opening: The root opening symbol is two parallel lines with arrows pointing away each other. This symbol is used to indicate the amount of space that should be left between the edges of the metal being welded.

– Backing strip: The backing strip symbol is a rectangle with a diagonal line. This symbol indicates that a backing strip is used on the back side of the welded joint.

– Weld-on both sides: The WeldWeld on both sides symbol is two parallel lines with an “X” in the middle. This symbol indicates that welding should be done on both sides of the joint.

– Welding process: The welding process symbol is a circle with an “F” inside it. This symbol indicates the type of welding process that is used.

– Heat input: The heat input symbol is a rectangle with a diagonal line across it and an “H” inside of it. This symbol indicates the amount of heat that should be applied to the joint being welded.

– Preheat: The preheat symbol is a triangle with a dot in the middle. This symbol indicates that the joint should be preheated before welding.

– Interface temperature: The temperature symbol is a rectangle with a diagonal line across it and an “I” inside of it. This symbol indicates the maximum temperature that is reached during welding.

– Post weld heat treatment: The post-weld heat treatment symbol is a rectangle with a diagonal line across it and a “P” inside of it. This symbol indicates that the joint is heated after welding.

– Welding current: The welding current symbol is a rectangle with a diagonal line across it and a “W” inside of it. This symbol is used to indicate the welding current that should be used.

– Welding voltage: The welding voltage symbol is a rectangle with a diagonal line across it and a “V” inside of it. This symbol is used to indicate the welding voltage that should be used.

Conclusion:

Welding symbols are used to provide essential information about Welds. As you can see, the framework surrounding welding symbols is quite simple. The cross-section view of the joints they represent is used to create most symbols. We hope this article has helped you better understand the Welding symbols.

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